My 2010 year in blogging — thanks to WordPress

Wow — thirteen 747’s — and a lucky number considering my (also here well documented) various flight anxieties.  Thanks, Automattic and all the cool WordPress folks, for this supercool summary!  Though I think you’re mighty generous with the praise, and the post highlights are mostly not my best loved, it’s OK: happily accepted. It’s still my birthday month after all …

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 5,500 times in 2010. That’s about 13 full 747s.

 

In 2010, there were 23 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 241 posts. There were 28 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 5mb. That’s about 2 pictures per month.

The busiest day of the year was January 6th with 182 views. The most popular post that day was Open-Head Innovation: Lessons from the closed-head fire sprinkler system.

 

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were twitter.com, facebook.com, WordPress Dashboard, leannewaldal.com, and mail.yahoo.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for jicama allergy, moya watson, jicama allergies, allergic to jicama, and allergy to jicama.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Open-Head Innovation: Lessons from the closed-head fire sprinkler system February 2009
1 comment

2

About May 2008
1 comment

3

could i be allergic to JICAMA? May 2003
4 comments

4

Save Our Schools: March 4 Day of Action March 2010
5 comments

5

This Morning’s City Safari July 2010
3 comments

NCLR: Not business as usual


Waterfall – Courtesy MLK

Originally uploaded by moyalynne

Congratulations to NCLR — National Center for Lesbian Rights — for opening up to the two-way dialog of blogging today, with http://overturn8.nclrights.org/.

Says Kate Kendell in today’s blog entry:

The New Year is off to a great start. After a bit of a breather for some over the holidays, it is clear that our community is not going back to business as usual. We know that 2009 has the potential to be a transformative year—but only with activism, action, involvement and vigilance…

Kendell, who provided part of the management of the No On Prop 8 campaign, has been subject to criticism (much of which online) since November’s heartbreaking passage of the proposition, but it’s clear she’s not just going back into her corner and cowering.

This sounds to me like an organization that has tuned in to the community since the election, listened in, and — here’s the key — responded to change. If Obama’s victory comes from the mantra of “change we can believe in,” “Yes we can” is something you can answer if you really can change. It reminds me of what Charles Darwin was purported to really have said about evolution:

It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

Don’t get me wrong — NCLR is full of some of the strongest, most intelligent people I know — but I’m impressed with this latest foray into being open to the online conversation. I hope you consider joining in.

And you, and you, and you: The heroes of No On Prop 8

Much has been written and discussed since November 4, 2008 in the attempt to sort out why our efforts in California against Proposition 8 failed to actually beat the proposition. We should of course study hard and learn from mistakes, and above all move forward with this momentum. But what continues to impress me the most is the collective spirit of giving — of all of your stories — that has taken place as a result of this profound effort. I devoted myself for an all-too-short time to the No On Prop 8 campaign (big thanks to my friend Calla Devlin for that opportunity), and for the record, I am honored to have been a part of it. I believe it has forever changed me in ways I’m not even fully aware of yet. Every one of you who played a part in sharing your stories during the campaign — you have affected me deeply. And you still do.

No On Prop 8 on Facebook

No On Prop 8 on Facebook

Anthony shared how he was a “recovered homophobe” — and how he overcame it. Eric twittered about being alone with a sign down in Los Angeles. A Mormon woman from California reached out, against the formal advice of her community, to say I cannot in mercy vote to destroy the legal protections they now enjoy. Entire families worked on the hard conversations, overcame fear, attended weddings, and wrote about it to others. People sold out the signs and rallied by the thousands. People of any persuasion stepped up for the right thing, to vote no on Prop 8. Steven, a straight man from Utah, stood by us faithfully in support. And every day, Abby sent us a personal dose of encouragement and cheer via Twitter. Those are just a few stories, off the top of my head, and are all YOU. T’was the season of personal giving — and it still is.

No On Prop 8 on Twitter

No On Prop 8 on Twitter

You continue to share your stories in person, on the streets thanks to Join the Impact, and on various social networks: over 172,000 of you on Facebook, 3,200 of you on Twitter, 4,500 on MySpace, and 300 on LinkedIn — which is not to mention the tens of thousands of views on a YouTube channel that rivaled Obama’s in popularity in the days leading up to the election (with — in a first for any political campaign in this country — YOU submitting stories for the official channel) – and the countless blogs and blog comments. I salute YOU.

That’s the real story here: YOU and who you ARE. If you haven’t already noticed, you’re making a big difference, continuing to reinforce that “the lines between what is a blog and what is a mainstream media site become less clear.” (People who work in the courts, by the way — they have the Internet, and they know how to use it.)

No On Prop 8 on LinkedIn

No On Prop 8 on LinkedIn

It is with that spirit that I’m impressed with the organizations involved in the campaign that are striving to bridge the gap between traditional and new media, with the ultimate goal of giving us all a place to be. Check out this page published by the NCLR yesterday:

No longer is it an official press release vs. a blog: it’s just you telling your story. Molly Tafoya recently shared this insight with me: the gift is not to tell people how to feel, but to help people talk about it. To help people share their stories: dare I say that this is the entire point?

Just at this moment @Pistachio comes in, as she is wont to do, with just the right lyric at just the right moment:

“I’m not being radical when I kiss you. I don’t love you to make a point. It’s the hollow of my heart that cries when I miss you.”

“Love is stronger than any words anyway” (Catie Curtis). Find a channel — any channel — but find a channel and, with your words, your pictures, your videos — share about who you are. Because in the end, the most radical thing to do is just to be — who you are.

On the day before the 30th anniversary of Harvey Milk’s death, I can’t say it a better way than this:

“There’s hope for a better tomorrow… And you, and you, and you have got to give them hope.”

PS: I leave you with one more channel:
http://change.gov/page/s/yourstory

Goodbye Blogger?

I was one of the original Blogger bloggers.  My Blogger blog is so old that it doesn’t even work properly anymore and some huge long list of complicated post-Google things still has to be done to convert it — especially the archive links.  But I do have one of those nifty Google / Blogger sweatshirts to show for the fact that I “bought” a Blogger blog way back when it cost money – and glad I was. Ev – did you singlehandedly light the fuse of Web 2.0?

At any rate — I feel a little duplicitous to be kicking around in WordPress now.  Until merging/purging/converting/whatever, so be it. I doubt it’s really goodbye Blogger, for now.

post from email

post from email

i just upgraded to blogger pro. already lost a post, and saw some
text errors in the blog post field. also looks like my browser is
crashing at the moment. but hey! we were warned after all this is
beta… and the big thing is it seems to resolve the ‘broken pipe’
publishing error – guessing because paying customers have better access
to ftp … and… and, i’m sending this via email!